Thursday, July 3, 2008

Uncle Brooks and Dad - Powell, Wyoming 1974

When Dad and Mother moved to 93rd south of Tumwater, Washington, they met many new people. One woman had Dad cut out wood for her tole painting activities. Dad was intrigued, and tried his hand at painting some pieces. He is explaining to Uncle Brooks about the technique - I think this piece was strawberries. When the Wasden family reunion was held in Lovell in 1974, Uncle Brooks and Aunt Lorraine came in their little camper on the back of their pickup, and camped in my back yard. Dad and Mother also stayed with us - don't know how we all fit into the little tiny house on south Clark, but it was fun. I remember that Diane (Paul) and her family came too late for most of the reunion, but they slept on my living room floor. Those were the days of one bathroom, too. Details like that were not important.
Our aunts and uncles were an important part of our life. Brooks and Lorraine, being the only ones who lived far away, and therefore, seen less often, were certainly an important part of our lives.

3 comments:

Judy said...

I like this. Those two did have a great trust and they shared stories and talents with each other.

Ann said...

I didn't know until I was reading through some of the letters Brooks had written to Mother and Dad, that there was, at one time, talk about moving to Oregon to work with Brooks. Evidently Brooks had looked into the possibility, found that work would be scarce around Medford, and thus the thought never went any further, at least according to the letters. It is such a strange thing to see Dad in these familiar poses, with a familiar shirt on. It is as though he is standing right beside me. And it is nice to see a picture of Brooks when he was healthy. This is a nice reminder of how life once was.

Tonya said...

My grandparents, Whitey and Alyce Hopkin, farmed in Penrose and after my grandfather passed away 6 years ago my grandmother moved to town. I remember my family mentioning the Blood name! My mother's cousin Young Fred Hopkin and his family lived in the Blood house for at least 15 years until they built their home in Penrose where they still farm. It was exciting to see your blog!